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IMPRS

Next application round starts 1st December 2016

Publications

1.
Gatsogiannis, C.; Merino, F.; Prumbaum, D.; Roderer, D.; Leidreiter, F.; Meusch, D.; Raunser, S.
Membrane insertion of a Tc toxin in near-atomic detail
2.
Rai, A.; Oprisko, A.; Campos, J.; Fu, Y.; Friese, T.; Itzen, A.; Goody, R. S.;  Gazdag, E. M.; Müller, M. P.
bMERB domains are bivalent Rab8 family effectors evolved by gene duplication

DOI
3.
Perez Galan, P.; Waldmann, H.; Kumar, K.
Building polycyclic indole scaffolds via gold(I)-catalyzed intra- and inter-molecular cyclization reactions of 1,6-enynes
DOI
4.
Masip, M.; Hübinger, J.; Christmann, J.; Sabet, O.; Wehner, F.; Konitsiotis, A.; Fuhr, G. R.; Bastiaens, P. I. H.
Reversible cryo-arrest for imaging molecules in living cells at high spatial resolution
DOI
5.
Weir, J. R.; Faesen, A. C.; Klare, K.; Petrovic, A.; Basilico, F.; Fischböck, J.; Pentakota, S.; Keller, J.; Pesenti, M. E.; Pan, D.; Vogt, D.; Wohlgemuth, S.; Herzog, F.; Musacchio, A.  

Insights from biochemical reconstitution into the architecture of human kinetochores

Events

IMPRS Distinguished Guest Seminar Series

Tuesday, 4th October 2016, 11:00 a.m. (Lecture Hall)

Speaker: Dr. Philipp Selenko
Group Leader In-cell NMR Spectrocopy, Leibniz Institute of Molecular Pharmacology, Berlin

Title: "Looking at proteins in live cells with atomic resolution: From Science Fiction to Science Reality"

Host:
Prof. Dr. Andrea Musacchio


Wednesday,  5th October 2016, 5 p.m. (Lecture Hall)

Speaker: Dr. Michael Lammers,
Institute for Genetics, University of Cologne

Title: "Unravelling the role of post-translational lysine acetylationusing a synthetic biological approach"

Host:
Dr. H. Neumann


Thursday, 6th October 2016, 11 a.m. (Lecture Hall)

Speaker: Dr. Nicholas Reyes
Institut Pasteur, Paris

Title: "Structure and dynamics of a theromstable human glutamate transporter"

Host: Prof. Dr. Stefan Raunser

 
 

Cells are the universal thread of biological matter, and their division is of outmost importance for organismal development and for the propagation of life across generations. The reductional division of cells, known as meiosis, gives rise to gametes, whose encounter restores the genetic content (ploidy) of organisms. The equational division of cells, known as mitosis, provides the daughter cells with faithful copies of the genome. Both process are accurate and closely regulated. Our laboratory studies the molecular mechanisms of cell division, their regulation, and their deregulation in the most common disease of cell division, cancerous transformation.

Prof. Dr. Andrea Musacchio
Department of Mechanistic Cell Biology

Cells are the universal thread of biological matter, and their division is of outmost importance for organismal development and for the propagation of life across generations. The reductional division of cells, known as meiosis, gives rise to gametes, whose encounter restores the genetic content (ploidy) of organisms. The equational division of cells, known as mitosis, provides the daughter cells with faithful copies of the genome. Both process are accurate and closely regulated. Our laboratory studies the molecular mechanisms of cell division, their regulation, and their deregulation in the most common disease of cell division, cancerous transformation. [more]
When scientists finished mapping the human genome in 2001, they were in for quite a surprise: Instead of the 80,000 to 130,000 genes that were expected, Homo sapiens has only 20,000 to 30,000 – about the same number as a mouse and just barely more than a simple one-millimetre-long worm with hardly any brain at all.

Prof. Dr. Philippe Bastiaens
Department of Systemic Cell Biology

When scientists finished mapping the human genome in 2001, they were in for quite a surprise: Instead of the 80,000 to 130,000 genes that were expected, Homo sapiens has only 20,000 to 30,000 – about the same number as a mouse and just barely more than a simple one-millimetre-long worm with hardly any brain at all. [more]
The plan sounded impressive, and garnering plenty of new inexpensive drugs appeared a sure thing. With the advent of synthesis robots at the beginning of the 1990s, the pharma industry could produce thousands of different small molecules in almost no time, and a veritable boom in substance research seemed in the offing.

Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. Herbert Waldmann
Department of Chemical Biology

The plan sounded impressive, and garnering plenty of new inexpensive drugs appeared a sure thing. With the advent of synthesis robots at the beginning of the 1990s, the pharma industry could produce thousands of different small molecules in almost no time, and a veritable boom in substance research seemed in the offing. [more]
 
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